Saturday, February 10, 2007

Ever fish open water in Febuary?


We did find fishable waters - as well as fish - in Kenai River today. The temperature was a mild 27 degrees and water was moving in the right spot. On the ice - in the distance - are a few ice fishing tents that were 200 feet back from the open water.


Photographic evidence that Cohos are still spawning in Kenai River on Feb. 10, 2007. A couple of them were almost edible still. There ended up to be quite a few anglers squatting our desired river bank most of the day. Turns out it's their secret spot, too! How 'bout that? Although silvers were caught and quite a few trout were caught by others, no trout (char, dolly, etc.) dared challenge our reputation as slayers of fish-kind. The trip was fun, fish were caught, and we didn't starve (or raid the neighbor's cabin).


Good day, and good blogging.

9 opinionated prattle:

Stan said...

Ah, there is nothing any better than a freshly spwaned Silver Salmon, the meat is so tender it melts in your mouth. Thanks for letting me know that you were coming down, I had to hear it from the blog world. I am assuming by piecing things together, there were four of you and by the pictures that assumption is realativley accurate. If I knew you were coming down, I would have met you up there to give you a little "professional" assitance in catvching Rainbow and Dollies. The least I could do, since I turned down a trip to go out and catch feeder King Salmon today. I did not get the chance to fish the upper Kenai thjis fall, that is one of my favorite fisheries in the fall. I would guess that you guys had a "good day on the water" - any day on the weater is a good day.

Stan said...

Pertaining to your "headline" regarding open water. Since you like to do research, I have a question that I have pondered for years, I have asked everyone about it, including biologists who should know the answer - to date no one has been able to tell me. Why doesn't the Upper Kenai River from Kenai Lake to Skilak Lake freeze over? Quartz Creek which also drains into Kenai Lake seldom freezes and is a small creek. But that portion of the Kenai River downstream of Skilak Lake to Cook Inlet will freeze over. Kasilof River, which is even siltier than the Kenai River will freeze over solid. All of the lower Kenai Peninsula Rivers, Ninilchik, Deep Creek, Striski Creek and Anchor River will freeze over yet they are at a lower and warmer elevation. The current on the upper Kenai River is not a factor, the water moves at the same rate on both the upper and lower Kenai river as well as the Kasilof River. Kenai Lake and Skilak Lake will freeze over - but not where you were fishing and downstream from that point to Skilak Lake. The Russian River will freeze over and it drains into the Kenai River and similar in elvation and temperatiure zone - so bottom line is why don't the Upper Kenai River and Quartz Creek seldom freeze over? Please reply, I await your answer most eagerly!

JD Plumma said...

Simple, grasshopper!

Kenai Lake is very deep. I understand it is 100 ft deep from each bank to the center. the sheer volume of water flowing (even in Feb.) would keep it from freezing at a lower temperature than the outlet of Skilak. We could stand in the river - after our felt soles froze - for 10 minutes before there was no slush on our boots. That tells me the water is, certainly, below freezing temperatures.

(This will be too wordy for comment and the answers will be revealed in due time...)

JD Plumma said...

hint:

The Russian River is shallower and carries much less debris (silt, etc.)thus - clear water...

Stan said...

Very good assumption Plumma, but not relative to the question. Kenai Lake is much deeper than 100 feet, however that is not important as Skilak Lake is much deeper than Kenai Lake, therefore using your theory the lower Kenai River would also reamin ice free, however it will freeze solid from bank to bank. The volume of water coming out of Skilak Lake is larger and the flow current is also faster than what you see at the mouth of Kenai Lake. Care to make another theory? Perhaps, a little research on "thermal energy" could be a key to the question?

Stan said...

Forgot to finish - Pertaining to the Russian River, you are probably correct, that is a theory that I developed several years ago as well, however, how do we account for the fact that the Russian River will freeze over and Quartz Creek will not normally freeze over all winter. It is much smaller and much slower moving water than the Russian River?

real eyez said...

I really do not know the answer, but I think I as told once it was because of the glacial silt...?

Stan said...

Eyez there! If glacvier siltation is the reason that the upper Kenai River does not freeze over, the Kasilof River has a higher density of silt than the Kenai River, however it freezes over. If your assumption was correct, then the lower Kenai river which freezes over also has a higher siltation because it drains from both the Kenai Lake and Skilak Lake. Quartz Creek is a clear water stream, free of silt yet it seldom will freeze over. Prognosis deserves merit, however, not plausible when you do a comaparable analysis.

JD Plumma said...

HAARP

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